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Corrugated Beauty.


This may seem a strange topic for my first blog post, but corrugated iron has been on my mind recently. A couple of weeks ago I joined the Facebook group - The Corrugated Iron Appreciation Society. Yes, there is such a thing and it's a lot of fun - many very nice photographs from all over the world. I am particularly fond of the way corrugated iron ages and weathers creating wonderful colours, patterns, and textures. There aren't many man-made building materials that look better with age and can blend into the landscape with grace. We're particularly blessed in The Scottish Highlands with many fine examples of its moldering beauty.

The picture above is of a, sadly, deserted cottage and fank made, it seems, entirely of corrugated iron at Kinbrace in Sutherland. I posted it to the group and it was very well received.


The picture above is from a building that used to stand just to the west of The Oykel Bridge Hotel, also in Sutherland. The yellow-painted corrugated iron has weathered beautifully along with the wood of the door and the sign, not to mention the rusty chain. Lovely!


Finally, the picture above is, I am sure, well-known to many of you. It's the red tin roof of the cottage that stands beside Loch Shieldaig in Wester Ross with the mountains of Torridon in the background. It has been featured in many a Scottish calendar and postcard - including my own.

I hope you enjoyed this post, Hugh.

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Guest
Nov 14, 2023

Just love this shot. I have spent many happy hours in Wester Ross - here and in Torridon itself and the area around.

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Guest
Nov 13, 2023

Yes lovely

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Guest
Nov 13, 2023

Having just created an illustrated talk - Tin Tabernacles - A Victorian Story - I was very interested in your blog and I too will look up the society and your facebook page. Thank you.

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Guest
Nov 13, 2023

I love corrugated iron buildings too. A memory from a poem 'I like Noise' learned in school in the 1950's begins; 'The rattle of rain on a galvanised roof'. I actually feel I can hear it!


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Replying to

Back in the 1970s I used to do a lot of youth hosteling with my dad and later with friends. Some of the hostels were very simple old cottages or ex-army buildings with tin roofs. I can remember the sound of the rain on those roofs. But, if it hailed all conversation ceased, improvised sign language was the only way to communicate - it was like being inside a tin drum. All good fun!

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wonderful photos as usual. I have seen the cottage over looking Torridon several times when I have stayed on Applecross. This is one of my favourite places in the north west as I so love the splendid mountains as much as I love the ones of Assynt.

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Replying to

I agree. They are both unique and wonderful places.

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